DVD: Finding Nemo – (2003)


DVD: Finding Nemo - (2003) Genre: Animation, Adventure, Comedy, Family, Release Date: 2003-11-04 Duration: 100 M...


DVD: Finding Nemo – (2003)

DVD: Finding Nemo - (2003)
Genre: Animation, Adventure, Comedy, Family,
Release Date: 2003-11-04
Duration: 100 Min
Director:

  • Andrew Stanton
  • Lee Unkrich

Two Clownfish, Marlin and his wife, Coral, are admiring their new home in the Great Barrier Reef. They are protecting their clutch of eggs that are due to hatch in a few days. Marlin then sees Coral looking worriedly at a barracuda a short distance away. Marlin tells Coral to get back into the anemone but she tries to protect their eggs. The barracuda then attacks them and Marlin attempts to save his wife but the barracuda knocks him out. When he regains consciousness, the barracuda has eaten Coral and all but one of their eggs. He names the last remaining egg Nemo, a name that Coral liked.

The film then moves on to Nemo’s first day of school. Nemo has an abnormally small right fin (due to a minor injury to his egg from the barracuda attack) which causes Marlin to not only worry over his swimming ability but also doubt his sons general capabilities. Once at school, Nemo disobeys his father and sneaks away from the reef towards a boat, resulting in him being captured by a scuba diver.

In search of help, Marlin bumps into Dory, a naïve but good-hearted and optimistic Regal tang with short-term memory loss. While meeting would-be vegetarian sharks Bruce, Anchor and Chum, Marlin discovers a diver’s mask that was dropped from the boat, and notices an address written on it. Before he has the chance to read it, however, a chaotic struggle against Bruce’s organic appetite occurs and shortly after his restoration, the mask is dropped into a trench in the deep sea. During a hazardous struggle with an anglerfish in the trench, Dory realizes she is able to read the address written on the mask, which leads to Sydney, and manages to remember it despite her short-term memory loss. After receiving directions from a large school of moonfish, Marlin and Dory set out to find Sydney. After a struggle with hypnotic jellyfish that nearly sting them to death, they are recovered by a surf cultured sea turtle named Crush, who takes them on the East Australian Current. In the current, Marlin reluctantly shares the details of his journey with a group of young sea turtles, and his story spreads rapidly across the ocean through word of mouth and eventually reaches Sydney.

Meanwhile, Nemo’s captor, a dentist, drops him into a fish tank in his office on Sydney Harbour. There, Nemo meets a group of aquarium fish called the “Tank Gang”, led by a crafty and ambitious moorish idol named Gill. The “Tank Gang” includes the fishes; Bloat, a puffer fish, Bubbles, a Yellow Tang, Peach, a Ochre Sea Star, Gurgle, a Royal gramma, Jacques, a Pacific Cleaner Shrimp and Deb a Blacktailed Humbug. The fish are frightened to learn that the dentist plans to give Nemo to his niece, Darla, who is overly-enthusiastic and infamous for killing a goldfish, named Chuckles, who was given to her previously, by constantly shaking its bag. In order to avoid the situation, Gill gives Nemo a role in an escape plan, which involves jamming the tank’s filter and forcing the dentist to remove the fish from the tank to clean it manually. After a friendly pelican named Nigel visits with news of Marlin’s adventure, Nemo succeeds in jamming the filter, but the plan backfires when the dentist installs a new high-tech filter.

Upon leaving the East Australian Current, Marlin and Dory become lost in a huge bloom of plankton, and are engulfed by the mouth of a blue whale after swimming in its path. Inside the whale’s immense mouth, a desperate Marlin repeatedly charges against the baleen in the whale’s mouth in a futile attempt to free himself and Dory, then breaks down in despair. Dory reassures him, then calmly tries to communicate with the whale. In response, the whale carries them to Sydney Harbour and expels them through its blowhole. They are then met by Nigel, who recognizes Marlin from the stories he has heard and rescues him and Dory from a flock of hungry seagulls by scooping them into his beak and taking them to the dentist’s office. By this time, Darla has arrived and the dentist is prepared to give Nemo to her. Nemo tries to play dead in hopes of saving himself, and, at the same time, Nigel arrives. Marlin sees Nemo and mistakes this act for the actual death of his son. After the dentist throws Nemo out, Gill helps Nemo escape into a drain through a sink plug-hole after a chaotic struggle.

Overcome with despair, Marlin leaves Dory and swims back towards his home. Dory then loses her memory and becomes confused, but meets Nemo, who has escaped into the ocean through an underwater drain pipe. Dory’s memory is suddenly restored after she reads the word “Sydney”, and, remembering her journey, she guides Nemo to Marlin. After the two joyfully reunite, Dory is caught in a fishing net among a school of grouper. Nemo enters the net with bravery and directs the group to swim downward to break the net, reminiscent of a similar scenario that occurred in the fish tank earlier in the film. The fish, including Dory, succeed and escape. At this point, Marlin is no longer overprotective or doubtful of his son’s safety.

Back at the dentist’s office, the high-tech filter breaks down and The Tank Gang have escaped into the harbor, but realize they are confined to the bags of water that the dentist put them into when cleaning the tank.

Star:


Albert Brooks

Ellen DeGeneres

Alexander Gould

Willem Dafoe


OR

Trending Tags:

کوس وکون تنگ دختران جوانکوس وکون videoشهوتخونه کلیپ کس کیر کون کردن کسدادن عکسفلم سکس فرزان نازسکسیسسكس تايلنديتايلند كوس زنانشهوتخونه کس و کون کردنگالری عکس سک ایرانیداستان باحال

2 responses to “DVD: Finding Nemo – (2003)”

  1. Nicholas Stix says:
    133 of 139 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Walt Would Approve, October 17, 2003
    By 
    Nicholas Stix (New York City/Queens) –

    This review is from: Finding Nemo (Two-Disc Collector’s Edition) (DVD)

    Recently, I saw Albert Brooks on Late Night with David Letterman, talking about Finding Nemo. Brooks, who stars as the voice of Marlon, the daddy fish, had taken his son (who, I believe was about five years old, the equivalent human age of Nemo), to the premiere. After about five minutes, Brooks said his son leaned over to him, and quietly said, the way a grownup might, “I cannot watch this movie,” and walked out. Late in the movie, the son returned, having obviously been crying. Leaning over, Brooks assured his son, “You are not Nemo.”

    Such is the power of this fish story about father and son clownfish who become separated, and must struggle to find their way back to each other. Marlon is a loving but neurotic and overprotective father; Nemo is a frustrated young fish who wants to be independent and see the world, and resents his father for preventing him from doing so. We see an ocean (read: the world) that is a terrible, heartless, and yet joyous place that we frail fish must confront, as best we can, because there’s no alternative.

    The animation was done by the wonderful folks from Pixar, who are the closest thing to the reincarnation of Walt Disney. There is simply no comparison between the animation of the typical, visually flat, politically correct, contemporary animated movie (many of which are produced by Walt Disney Pictures!) and Nemo. In Nemo, the ocean floor looks like the ocean. And the characters are all … characters. They are all physically distinctive, wonderfully written, and performed by gifted actors who – if you’ll pardon the cliché – will alternately make you laugh and cry. Of particular note are Barry Humphries as Bruce the Shark, Geoffrey Rush as Nigel the Pelican, Willem Dafoe as Gill, Allison Janney as Peach, and of course, young Alexander Gould as Nemo. Ellen Degeneres, in particular, steals every scene she’s in, as Dory, a gregarious fish whose memory leaks like a sieve. But this is Albert Brooks’ movie. The Academy should give this man a special Oscar for the most moving voice work my wife and I have ever heard.

    Thomas Newman, of the musical Newman clan (Alfred, Lionel, Randy) has produced a score that is subtle and unobtrusive much of the time, but at dramatic moments takes over, and is more impressive, with repeated viewings. He deserves his fifth Oscar nomination for Nemo.

    Andrew Stanton’s (Toy Story, Monsters, Inc.) screenplay, written with Bob Peterson and David Reynolds, brims with intelligence and wit (e.g., in an AA-style group of recovering – and frequently lapsing – sharks, the members intone, “I am a nice shark, not an eating machine…. Fish are friends, not food”), and Stanton’s direction does not waste a scene. Every moment in Nemo will either charm you or move you. In fact, as my wife remarked, for all of its many comic scenes, this is one of the most moving movies you’ll ever see. We’ve already seen it several times with our three-and-a-half-year-old son, who loves it, and yet with each new viewing, we notice things we’d previously missed.

    Though I wish Nemo would win all of the big Oscars (Best Picture, Director, Screenplay), I doubt Academy voters will choose it over its live-action competition. And yet, I will be very surprised, if a better picture — live action or animated — is released this year. Finding Nemo is truly a find.

    Originally published in The Critical Critic, October 17, 2003.

  2. Gary Jaffe says:
    135 of 145 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Pixar’s getting in a habit of constantly outdoing themselves, June 7, 2003
    By 
    Gary Jaffe(REAL NAME)
      

    Finding Nemo is the fifth installment for Pixar Studios, the most reliable studio in Hollywood today, and it is my personal favorite. The first obviously outstanding aspect of the movie is the animation. From the breathtaking wonder of the Great Barrier Reef, to the cold, sterile fish tank, the animation is top notch and truly state of the art. The water, which has always been the bane of animation, is picture perfect, and the animators have captured the rolling but constant ocean and the light refractions perfectly. But animation itself doesn’t make a film. Finding Nemo’s strongest aspect is it’s warm, witty, heartfelt, and funny story of a father’s quest to reclaim his son. The kids will love the vibrant characters and funny situations, and so will the parents. However, the parents will be able to enjoy the film on a level far more than the kids will. The story is about losing a child, and the desperate quest to be reunited, which will hit the parent right in the gut. This is the story’s dark side, which has, thankfully, not been sugar coated by the creators. Overall, lets just say Halleluja, Pixar, you’ve done it again!


Economic Flash News


Interest Rates Rise 'Signal Economy Growing'

A rise in interest rates is a sign the UK economy is emerging from a crisis period and is growing, George Osborne has argued. The Chancellor sought to strike an upbeat note on the move which is set to see some people's mortgage payments go up, after Bank of England Governor Mark Carney gave a strong hint they may increase before the General Election next May. In his first Mansion House speech since becoming governor, Mr Carney warned "gradual and limited" increases would be needed as the economy recovers. With the economy recovering faster than anticipated, analysts predict the interest rate hike could even come as early as this year.